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7 fertility myths that could hinder your pregnancy

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Sister Nadi
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Joined: Fri May 18, 2012 9:14 am

7 fertility myths that could hinder your pregnancy

Unread post by Sister Nadi » Fri May 12, 2017 4:50 pm

You may not have put a lot of thought into getting pregnant. Not everyone plans, charts, or tries to predict ovulation. A lot of couples just let nature take its course and see what happens.

On the other hand, some couples purchase BBT thermometers, ovulation kits, and plan intercourse on a schedule, but still don’t get pregnant.

There are several misconceptions about ovulation and when to have intercourse. These myths and misconceptions could be keeping you from getting pregnant. The number one myth is that you should have sex on day 14 of your cycle if you want to get pregnant. Well you have probably heard that most women ovulate on day 14 of their cycle.

This is simply not true. It is based on the calendar method of predicting ovulation. If you have a perfect 28 day cycle, where your luteal phase (the second half of your cycle) is exactly 14 days long, you would likely ovulate around day 14.

Most women, however, do not have perfect cycles and even the women who do have regular cycles, usually do not ovulate at exactly the same time each month.

Myth number two is that you should have sex 24-72 hours after you ovulate. Actually there is some confusion over when to have sex if you are trying to get pregnant. Yes, it is true that you want to time intercourse very close to ovulation. Where many couples go wrong, is they only have sex when they think they are ovulating or they have sex after they ovulate.

There are two problems with this strategy, the first is that once you ovulate your egg will only survive for about 12-24 hours (not 72).

If you do not start having intercourse until the day you ovulate you may be only giving yourself a 12 hour opportunity to get pregnant.

Sperm can live for up to five days so having sex before (not after) ovulation is very important. Ideally you want to have intercourse one or two days before you ovulate.

The other problem with this strategy is that many women can not tell when they are ovulating. If you are not sure when you are ovulating or if you miscalculate your ovulation day, you could be having sex on all the wrong days.

Having sex regularly three times a week is one of the best ways to be sure you are having sex at the right time.

Myth number three is usually that you are most fertile the day your temperature rises on your BBT chart. BBT Charting is a great way to learn about your cycle and to determine if you are ovulating; however, it is not the best way to predict ovulation. By the time you see your temperature rise on your bbt chart you have already ovulated.

Even though temperature charting isn’t very helpful for predicting ovulation, it is useful for confirming ovulation. It can also be useful for detecting fertility problems such as anovulatory cycles or luteal phase defects.

source: http://www.vanguardngr.com/2011/02/7-fe ... pregnancy/


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