How To Prevent Unwanted Pregnancy

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Which method gives you a reliable protections and STD?

A. Intrauterine Contraceptive Device [ IUD]
0
No votes
B. Male Condom
0
No votes
C. Female Condom
0
No votes
D. Morning After Pill. [ Postinor]
0
No votes
E. Abstinence
0
No votes
F. Withdrawal Method
0
No votes
G. Injectable
1
100%
H. Bilateral Tubal Ligation [ BTL]
0
No votes
 
Total votes: 1

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Kunle Emmanuel
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How To Prevent Unwanted Pregnancy

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Sun Feb 21, 2016 12:53 pm

Birth control refers to the methods or devises used to prevent pregnancy. It is also known as fertility control. The planning, provision and use of birth control practices is known as family planning. People have used various birth control methods for thousands of years. Today, there are many different safe and effective birth control methods available to us in our various countries or communities. There is no best method for achieving this and it is important for people to know from the outset that any form of birth control has its peculiar advantages and disadvantages.

All men and women ought to know that they have some measure of control over what method they ultimately choose depending on their peculiar life styles, whether they intend to have children in the future (not a consideration) in Nigerian women I am sure, and how many times they have sex in a week for example or how many sexual partners they have. Above all, there must be an objective assessment of how many different side effects any of the methods chosen will have on the individual. Above all, there must be a realistic assessment of how much level of comfort or the lack of it a person will endure as a result of any particular choice.

In many Nigerian communities, and in some religious circles, it is anathema to talk about family planning. The truth of the matter, however, is that even among some of those people family planning practices have been practised in some benign form for many generations. It began in many local communities when polygamy was the rule and men would send their pregnant wives away to their mothers’ in-law when the time of childbirth approached. Sometimes, this was done soon after a delivery had occurred so that such women could be adequately cared for.

The unstated reason for such forced migration, however, was that such women were considered temporarily unavailable for sexual relationships and this tended to persist all through the period of breast feeding. They also understood that breast feeding mothers were unable to get pregnant while they still actively breastfed. In the years to come, the relationship between the flow of breast milk and the inability to get pregnant was proven by science to have a “cause and effect” relationship. In that entire period, attention turned to one of the other wives in the family. As a man’s wealth was then measured by the number of wives he had, so it reflected in the number of children he sired. The women in the household took turns to have their children.

More recently though, as attention moved away from polygamy to the true nuclear family, there evolved many different types of birth control practices some of which we shall have to deal with here.

1) Continuous abstinence: This means that a person will not have sex under any form of sexual intercourse for the period they desire. This is the only guaranteed way to avoid a pregnancy and to prevent contracting sexually transmitted diseases. At the moment, monks, Roman Catholic fathers and sisters and people incapacitated by disease are known to practice this form of birth control.

2) The natural method: This is also known as the rhythm method or the Billings’s method. By this is meant that a woman will have to be certain about the peculiarities of her menstrual cycle and also know how her ovulation period is demonstrated. When she knows this, she will then have to note that for a period of five days before the date and for two or three days after ovulation has occurred, she can get pregnant. That means pregnancy is possible for about six to eight days in each cycle. To stay safe, those days will be marked as sex free days while the remaining days in the monthly cycle will obviously be free of any risk of getting pregnant.

3) The male condom: This is widely available in most kinds of shops in Nigeria. They are made of various materials like latex, polyurethrane or lamb skin and in essence, they are a thin sheathe of material placed over an erect penis to prevent ejaculated semen from getting into a woman’s vagina. They are more effective when used together with a spermicide that can kill off the sperms should the condom tear. Condoms must be changed with each sexual act.

4) The female condom: This has never been a very popular means of contraception because of the fact that is not so handy to put in place. It is made of lubricated rubber and worn by a woman inside her vagina to prevent the sperm from getting into her body. However, it can be inserted for up to eight hours before having sex but a new one must be worn with each act and it should not be used together with the male condom.

5) The oral contraceptive; the combined pill: This contains the two female hormones of oestrogen and progesterone. It has to be taken every day and acts to prevent the ovaries from releasing their eggs. It is not suitable for use by women who are older than 35 years or have a history of blood clots or a history of previous breast, liver or uterine disease, specifically, cancer. It is also not advisable for use by smoking women. The use of antibiotics, which many Nigerian women take without prescription, can reduce the effectiveness of the oral pill.

6) The intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD): It is also called the IUD, which simply does away with the word contraceptive but may often be confused with intrauterine death. However, it is shaped like a “T” and made of copper. The device releases a small amount of copper into the womb at a time which prevents the sperm from reaching and fertilising the egg. It is a device usually inserted by a family planning nurse or a doctor and can be left in place for five to ten years. There is also the hormonal IUD which releases a hormone into the womb to achieve the same purpose as above. It can stay for up to five years. The Lippes loop, essentially a plastic coil, is no longer in use in many countries.

7) The patch: This is a skin patch worn on the buttocks, outer arm, abdomen or upper body to release oestrogen and progestin into the blood stream in tiny amounts which prevents conception. It achieves this by preventing the eggs from being released by the ovaries. This is fairly popular among Nigerian women.

8) The shot or injection: This is a hormonal injection made up of progestin alone. It is called Depo-Provera and is also popular among women here. It is given on the buttocks or arm once every three months. It acts similarly to the other hormonal preparations above. There is a similar “oestrogen only” injectable given every two months and called Noristherat. This is much less popular than Depo-Provera.

9) Vaginal ring: This is a thin flexible ring that releases oestrogen and progestin and is worn in the vagina for three weeks and then taken out for a week so that the woman wearing it can have her period, before being replaced with a new one.

10) Vasectomy: This is a permanent means of birth control in which the spermatic cord is cut and the ends tied separately by an operation. Amazingly, even women do not want their husbands to have this procedure done.

11) Bilateral tubal ligation (BTL): This is also achieved by an operation but it is seldom the sole reason for carrying out the operation. Usually, it may be a part of some other operation like a caesarean section. It is regarded as a permanent means of birth control.

12) Emergency sterilisation: This is done usually with hormonal drugs in situations in which an unplanned sexual encounter has occurred or as in rape. Medications like “the morning after pill” (not the real name) are taken up to 72 hours after such an encounter in order to prevent a pregnancy from occurring.

13) Contraceptive sponge: This is a barrier method of birth control made of polyurethrane. It is thus a soft, thin material resembling rubber and has a handle for removing it from the vagina. It also contains a spermicide that can kill off the sperm. It is useful for up to 24 hours and can thus be used for multiple rounds of sex. It should be left in place for at least 6 hours after all sex has ceased in order to reliably kill off all the available sperm.

14) The diaphragm, cervical cap or cervical shield: These are other barrier methods of female contraception made from various materials. All of them act by preventing sperm from crossing from the vagina into the uterus.


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Re: How To Prevent Unwanted Pregnancy

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Sun Feb 21, 2016 2:33 pm

Drinking salt-water does not prevent pregnancy! Washing with potash (“kanwa”), garlic, or recently, Coca-cola doesn’t work either! So what works?
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Re: How To Prevent Unwanted Pregnancy

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Sun Feb 21, 2016 2:44 pm

1: A very powerful alternative to sex is abstinence from sex! It is 100% safe! Preventing pregnancy and infections. Lack of sex does not kill, neither does it have any adverse effect on health, either of the mind or the body! Don’t I just love abstinence!

2: Calendar Method (or calculation of safe period) is a very good place to start, especially for ladies with regular menstrual cycle (that is, you see your period about the same time monthly, with only few days plus or minus). Simply put, if we call the day you started menstruating day 1 and 8 days after you started menstruating as day 8, then avoid sex from day 8 through day 19. Every other day is safe, including days you menstruate! That is day 1 to day 7 is safe; and also, day 20 after commencement of menses to the next menses!
Generally avoid days around day 14, ovulation period. Take time to study this method and your cycle. It is not just cheap; it is free, and very effective.

3: Withdrawal method, taking out the male organ just in time before ejaculation (releasing), has proven to be quite effective. This however requires skill and self-control from the guy. But, it is said to obstruct the flow of the whole process! He must be experienced to know when he is about releasing sperm. (People practice by masturbating to become familiar with that point!) Some whitish semen-like fluid comes out before the actual release; this doesn’t usually contain sperm cell; its for lubrication. Failure comes from being carried away and not coming out before release. Failure also comes from going for another round after releasing; some semen remains within, which can only be removed by urinating.
In summary, come out way before release; urinate to clear the pipeline before going in for another round, which is not usually advisable. How dangerous semen is!

4: We all know about condoms! People, especially guys, complain about how it reduces sensitivity. Yet it has a high percentage of effectiveness if used correctly, and it also protects from several deadly diseases, including HIV/AIDS. It is cheap, and it prolongs intercourse, helping the guy to last longer! Failure comes from condom breaking, or slipping off during or after intercourse. Check the expiry date. Don’t lubricate with vaseline or baby oil; rather go to a pharmacy and get KY Jelly for lubricating the condom if you must. Make sure she is well aroused before penetration. Allow for some space at the tip of the condom. And make sure you come out before the male organ becomes too soft, holding the base of the condom while you carefully come out to prevent spillage. Don’t use condoms more than once. In case of breakage or spillage, get emergency contraception.

5: I won’t talk much about contraceptive pills! It is among the most effective, but for the side-effects, like weight increase. Emergency contraceptives, like Postinor, are very effective in preventing pregnancy if taken within 72 hours after sex — the earlier, the better. If you vomit within 3 hours of taking the tablet, take another one. It doesn’t protect for subsequent sex. It may, however, affect your next menses in timing (it may come earlier or later) or in volume (it may be heavy or scanty, or not at all!)

Its best to combine two or more methods; it raises the effectiveness of preventing pregnancy to near 100%! For example, consider “safe period withdrawal” or “abstinence abstinence”! Lol.

These methods prevent pregnancy, but don’t prevent guilt. Condoms cover the organ and not the conscience.
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Re: How To Prevent Unwanted Pregnancy

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:21 am

Let’s first talk of what a lady must not take because it will surely fail:

Not Flagyl.
Not Krest.
Not sprite.
Not alum.
Not salt and water.
Not milk and malt.
Not 7Up and alabukun.
Not Andrew Liver Salt.

All these things do NOTHING to prevent a pregnancy. So what can she take?

Most of those listed items and a lot more- are actually unfortunate myths pushed by people who mean well but are actually ignorant about the biology and science behind getting pregnant.

So many tried those things and failed- but they keep quiet so more women can fool themselves.
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Re: How To Prevent Unwanted Pregnancy

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:23 am

So if you just had sex-
What can you use to safely prevent a pregnancy?

There’s a simple answer.
And there is a complex answer.

The simple answer is the Post Pill.
(Or what we commonly call Postinor).

Use that immediately after sex and you have more than 90% chance of success.

The PostPill can be gotten at any good pharmacy- simply walk in and ask.

The possibility of being shamed by others at the store should not stop you from getting the PostPill.

Note:
Preventing a pregnancy is far safer and better than going for an abortion. Always remember that.

Remember: PostPill has to be used within 72hours of sex. The earlier you use, the more effective it is.

After 72hours- it is better to go and buy baby products and start to check google for cute baby names.

This is no joke.
If you know you don’t want a baby,
Don’t waste time.

Finally, ideally you should NOT use PostPill more than once every 3months-

Postinor is NOT vitamin C,
You can’t be licking it every Friday on your way back from Elegushi.

That’s excessive and inappropriate use.
And it can mess up your hormones and your period. Pls beware dear.

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