Welcome to Naija Nurses Forum

Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to contribute to this site by submitting your own content or replying to existing content. You'll be able to customize your profile, receive reputation points as a reward for submitting content.

PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF LASSA FEVER.

Forum rules
The information contained on this web site is for information purposes and is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure or prevent any disease.
User avatar
Kunle Emmanuel
Webmaster
Webmaster
Reactions:
Posts: 1946
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 5:02 pm
Location: Lagos
Contact:

PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF LASSA FEVER.

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Tue Dec 20, 2016 1:32 pm

Prevention of Lassa fever relies on promoting good “community hygiene” to discourage rodents from entering homes. Effective measures include storing grain and other foodstuffs in rodent-proof containers, disposing of garbage far from the home, maintaining clean households and keeping cats. Because Mastomys are so abundant in endemic areas, it is not possible to completely eliminate them from the environment. Family members should always be careful to avoid contact with blood and body fluids while caring for sick persons.

In health-care settings, staff should always apply standard infection prevention and control precautions when caring for patients, regardless of their presumed diagnosis. These include basic hand hygiene, respiratory hygiene, use of personal protective equipment (to block splashes or other contact with infected materials), safe injection practices and safe burial practices.

Health-care workers caring for patients with suspected or confirmed Lassa fever should apply extra infection control measures to prevent contact with the patient’s blood and body fluids and contaminated surfaces or materials such as clothing and bedding. When in close contact (within 1 metre) of patients with Lassa fever, health-care workers should wear face protection (a face shield or a medical mask and goggles), a clean, non-sterile long-sleeved gown, and gloves (sterile gloves for some procedures).

Laboratory workers are also at risk. Samples taken from humans and animals for investigation of Lassa virus infection should be handled by trained staff and processed in suitably equipped laboratories under maximum biological containment conditions.

On rare occasions, travellers from areas where Lassa fever is endemic export the disease to other countries. Although malaria, typhoid fever, and many other tropical infections are much more common, the diagnosis of Lassa fever should be considered in febrile patients returning from West Africa, especially if they have had exposures in rural areas or hospitals in countries where Lassa fever is known to be endemic. Health-care workers seeing a patient suspected to have Lassa fever should immediately contact local and national experts for advice and to arrange for laboratory testing.


Nigerian Nurses lighting up the world one candle at a time.

User avatar
Kunle Emmanuel
Webmaster
Webmaster
Reactions:
Posts: 1946
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 5:02 pm
Location: Lagos
Contact:

Re: PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF LASSA FEVER.

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Tue Dec 20, 2016 1:42 pm

Humans usually become infected with Lassa virus from exposure to urine or faeces of infected Mastomys rats. Lassa virus may also be spread between humans through direct contact with the blood, urine, faeces, or other bodily secretions of a person infected with Lassa fever. There is no epidemiological evidence supporting airborne spread between humans. Person-to-person transmission occurs in both community and health-care settings, where the virus may be spread by contaminated medical equipment, such as re-used needles. Sexual transmission of Lassa virus has been reported.

Lassa fever occurs in all age groups and both sexes. Persons at greatest risk are those living in rural areas where Mastomys are usually found, especially in communities with poor sanitation or crowded living conditions. Health workers are at risk if caring for Lassa fever patients in the absence of proper barrier nursing and infection prevention and control practices.
Image
Nigerian Nurses lighting up the world one candle at a time.

User avatar
Kunle Emmanuel
Webmaster
Webmaster
Reactions:
Posts: 1946
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 5:02 pm
Location: Lagos
Contact:

Re: PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF LASSA FEVER.

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Tue Dec 20, 2016 1:44 pm

The incubation period of Lassa fever ranges from 2–21 days. The onset of the disease, when it is symptomatic, is usually gradual, starting with fever, general weakness, and malaise. After a few days, headache, sore throat, muscle pain, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, cough, and abdominal pain may follow. In severe cases facial swelling, fluid in the lung cavity, bleeding from the mouth, nose, vagina or gastrointestinal tract and low blood pressure may develop.

Protein may be noted in the urine. Shock, seizures, tremor, disorientation, and coma may be seen in the later stages. Deafness occurs in 25% of patients who survive the disease. In half of these cases, hearing returns partially after 1–3 months. Transient hair loss and gait disturbance may occur during recovery.

Death usually occurs within 14 days of onset in fatal cases. The disease is especially severe late in pregnancy, with maternal death and/or fetal loss occurring in more than 80% of cases during the third trimester.

Diagnosis
Because the symptoms of Lassa fever are so varied and non-specific, clinical diagnosis is often difficult, especially early in the course of the disease. Lassa fever is difficult to distinguish from other viral haemorrhagic fevers such as Ebola virus disease as well as other diseases that cause fever, including malaria, shigellosis, typhoid fever and yellow fever.

Definitive diagnosis requires testing that is available only in reference laboratories. Laboratory specimens may be hazardous and must be handled with extreme care. Lassa virus infections can only be diagnosed definitively in the laboratory using the following tests:
1. reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay
2. antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)
3. antigen detection tests
4. virus isolation by cell culture.

Treatment.
The antiviral drug ribavirin seems to be an effective treatment for Lassa fever if given early on in the course of clinical illness. There is no evidence to support the role of ribavirin as post-exposure prophylactic treatment for Lassa fever.

There is currently no vaccine that protects against Lassa fever.
Nigerian Nurses lighting up the world one candle at a time.

CathrynFitzpatrick
Reactions:
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2016 7:28 am

Re: PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF LASSA FEVER.

Unread post by CathrynFitzpatrick » Fri Jan 20, 2017 11:14 am

According to researched of Essay writers The number of Lassa virus infections according to year in West Africa is expected at a hundred,000 to three hundred,000, with about five,000 deaths. unfortunately, such estimates are crude, because surveillance for cases of the ailment isn't uniformly achieved. In some areas of Sierra Leone and Liberia, it is known that 10%-sixteen% of humans admitted to hospitals have Lassa fever, which suggests the extreme impact of the ailment at the population of this region.

Mary Toms
Reactions:
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2017 3:46 pm

Re: PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF LASSA FEVER.

Unread post by Mary Toms » Sat Mar 18, 2017 3:52 pm

The quantity of Lassa infection contaminations every year in West Africa is evaluated at 80,000 to 200,000, with roughly 4,000 passings. Shockingly, such gauges are rough, since reconnaissance for instances of the infection is not consistently performed. In a few regions of Sierra Leone and Liberia, it is realized that 10% to 14% of individuals admitted to healing centers have Lassa fever, which demonstrates the genuine effect of the illness on the number of inhabitants in this district.

Regards
Head Nurse at Quality Dissertation Writing Service

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic

Social Media

       
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests