I'm healthy so why's my blood pressure high?

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Kunle Emmanuel
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I'm healthy so why's my blood pressure high?

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Fri May 16, 2014 11:13 am

Can you explain why I have high blood pressure? I am 56, a size ten, don't smoke, rarely drink and exercise regularly. I take 4mg of perindopril, but it isn't effective enough. However, instead of looking for a reason as to why my blood pressure is high, my medication is going to be increased. Why aren't more checks done about the cause when a patient is otherwise healthy?
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Re: I'm healthy so why's my blood pressure high?

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Fri May 16, 2014 11:14 am

Given your situation, I can see why you are puzzled, and there are probably many readers in a similar position.


Most people who have high blood pressure have no symptoms, so taking the one, two or even three medications they've been prescribed needs commitment, not least as they'll have to do this long term and the pills may have side-effects, such as gout or ankle swelling.


The obvious question, as you have put it, is why this has happened to you. What is needed is a careful explanation, though this isn't always forthcoming, so this short tutorial may help.
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Re: I'm healthy so why's my blood pressure high?

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Fri May 16, 2014 11:16 am



A blood pressure reading consists of two figures - the first is the systolic pressure, the pressure in the arteries when the heart contracts. A normal reading is 120 or lower.

The second figure, the diastolic pressure, is when the heart relaxes - this should be 80 or lower.
If the reading is consistently above 140 over 90, this is known as hypertension. The diagnosis should not be made until blood pressure has been measured after three to six visits over some weeks. This is because it can be affected by factors such as physical activity, and varies from minute to minute.
This is why we sometimes arrange for 'ambulatory' blood pressure monitoring, using an automatic system to record measurements every 30 minutes or so, day and night, as the patient goes about daily life.

Once diagnosed, it's important to distinguish between primary, or 'essential' hypertension, where there is no identifiable cause, and secondary hypertension.


The second figure, the diastolic pressure, is when the heart relaxes (posed by model)


This is when there is an identifiable cause, such as kidney disease, oral contraceptives and some medicines (eg, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs), hormonal disorders including thyroid problems and obstructive sleep apnoea (a night-time breathing disorder that affects some overweight people).


Secondary hypertension is less common, but it must be excluded with blood tests and other investigations, not least because it is often 'curable'. But 90 per cent of hypertension cases are unexplained, though we know there are many risk factors such as obesity, lack of physical activity, genetics (such as hypertension in one or both parents), a high salt intake and vitamin D deficiency.


Age is another factor - as we get older, blood pressure rises.

The reason it's so important for hypertension to be detected, and treated effectively, is that the adverse effects are so serious.


It's a major risk factor for heart disease, more so than smoking, high cholesterol or diabetes. It's also the most important risk factor for stroke and kidney disease.

So, WHEN a patient has been diagnosed with hypertension, it's vital we check for heart or kidney damage.


We also need to identify any potential curable causes; this mainly involves blood tests.


Once all this is done, the patient must be started on a suitable long-term treatment. This will include reducing their salt intake, losing weight and regular exercise. If the systolic reading is consistently above 140 (150 for those over 60) and the diastolic is over 90, then it means starting on an anti-hypertensive drug.


The greater the reduction in pressure, the greater the reduction in heart attack or stroke risk.

You are taking 4mg of perindopril a day. This is an ACE inhibitor, which helps blood vessels relax. If this is ineffective, the dose can be increased up to 8mg.


Many patients need a second or even third drug to regulate their blood pressure, and if that's the case, so be it.


Nothing matters more than achieving a steady level of suitably lowered blood pressure for the long term - you must work on it with your doctor.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/artic ... -high.html
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Re: I'm healthy so why's my blood pressure high?

Unread post by mantishugo » Sat Oct 18, 2014 11:21 am

I wasn't knowing the relation between blood pressure and health. I always thought if a person has normal blood pressure he can avoid many of the health related problems. Thanks to this post that now I have learned a lot. I want to add what I know whether it is a myth or fact. If we have high blood pressure, we should not eat salt. And if we have low blood pressure, we should not eat sweet. Correct me if my information is incorrect.

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Re: I'm healthy so why's my blood pressure high?

Unread post by GoargeWilliam » Tue Mar 10, 2015 12:52 pm

There are many reasons of blood pressure diseases. But depressionand tension is one of the major cause of blood pressure.If you want to get rid from it then you should keep tension free yourself.

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Re: I'm healthy so why's my blood pressure high?

Unread post by Dave Tong » Fri Mar 13, 2015 6:07 am

Blood pressure is another problem and has no link with smartness but it has some problem with health. The better is to avoid pills and do walk for this purpose. Walk reduces blood pressure and it gives consistency in the body and blood pressure may be normal if walk is done daily and diet plays very important role in blood pressure, if you take balance diet then you may reduce fats and ultimately blood circulation is accurate and there are less chances of high blood pressure and it turns to normal blood pressure.

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Re: I'm healthy so why's my blood pressure high?

Unread post by chrishelms » Wed Mar 18, 2015 1:20 pm

After 50 High Blood Pressure, is a common disease in many peoples.

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Re: I'm healthy so why's my blood pressure high?

Unread post by johnsmith » Thu Aug 22, 2019 6:24 pm

The strict causes of high blood pressure are not recognized, but some things may play a role, including:
• Smoking
• Being overweight or obese
• Lack of physical activity
• Too much salt in the diet
• Too much alcohol consumption (more than 1 to 2 drinks per day)
• Stress
• Older age
• Genetics
• Family history of high blood pressure
• Chronic kidney disease
• Adrenal and thyroid disorders
• Sleep apnea

But you can control high blood pressure by following doctor’s guidelines.

Thanks
JohnSmith Via-
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