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Must read for all Nigerian nurses – RN to BSN Upgrade

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Must read for all Nigerian nurses – RN to BSN Upgrade

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Fri Sep 14, 2012 10:18 am

There are many problems confronting the nursing profession which are not peculiar to Nigerian nurses as other countries also encounter such problems. One of these problems is the issue of obtaining BSc. degree qualification by nurses with diploma qualifications. The problem is a global phenomenon in the nursing profession. Developed countries like America, United Kingdom, Australia, and South Africa have also had this problem and have found solutions to it.

INSIGHT INTO THE PROBLEM
As it was and still largely is, hospitals are responsible for nursing training, and not the universities therefore the certificates are not academic certificates (reason why the RN certificate has no academic qualification; hospitals do not award academic qualifications). This traditional and old method of nursing education i.e. the hospital-based program is a 3-year course, which is practical intensive. At the successful ending of the training, diploma certificates are awarded to the student nurses, after which the students are now regarded as registered nurses (RN). This training is not university-based. This system of nurse training is still the main system of training nurses in Nigeria with almost every state of the federation having at least one of such schools of nursing. The university nurse training also operates but the number of nurses it produces is incomparably small compared to what the schools of nursing produces. Majority of the nurses (not less than 70% by my estimation) in Nigeria are trained in the schools of nursing and still hold diploma certificates.

MY VIEW POINT
I participated in the Lagos MCPDP workshop which was held from June 11 – 15, 2012 where over 250 nurses were in attendance, and also in which representatives of the Nursing council and nursing leaders were present. The issue of RN/BSc was part one of the issues discussed in the communiqué at the end of the workshop. Many nurses spoke their minds and emotions ran high as expected. Like some others, I was also given the opportunity to mount the podium to make comments (was the last commentator). In my comments, I suggested that a register be passed round, to contain the registration numbers/PIN and signatures of all the workshop participants which would be attached to the communiqué and sent to the Nursing Council. I told them that doing so would add voice, force and strength to our demands/agitations; otherwise what we have done would end up being a mere discussion amongst ourselves. The suggestion was welcome by the audience but overlooked by the workshop organizers who did nothing about it till the participants dispersed (unfortunately that was the last day of the workshop).
I still suggest that this measure be adopted as a method of giving voice and force to the demands of nurses as regards pressing issues. If there were over 250 participants at a workshop just in one month and in one state, then one can imagine the number of nurses capable of pushing their collective demands through their signatures and PINs if this suggested measure were to be adopted at every workshop in individual state of the federation.

Here again are some of the suggestions I made at the workshop:
1. That a deadline be given to phase out hospital-based diploma nursing, and make the entry into nursing strictly BSc. i.e stop admissions into nursing schools. This will allow the already-admitted diploma students to graduate while no new admissions will be made. One of the ways of achieving this is to affiliate the schools of nursing to universities or scrap them; because inasmuch as the schools still operate, people will always seek admission into them. It will become totally unfair for the nurses, after graduating with RN diploma to be told they still need to return to the university to earn their degrees or be discriminated against because of their diploma certificates. This is the situation a lot of nurses have presently found themselves in, and are seriously confused and troubled as to how to earn their Bsc; hence my suggestion.

2. That the 3-year nursing diploma is just a certificate and has no academic qualification equivalent because it is a core hospital-based training (apprenticeship) run by the hospitals under the ministry of health and not by any University. Therefore there is need to quantify and qualify the nursing diploma academically (e.g. HND) and fit it properly into the National Qualification framework (NQF). (Note: This quantification is not the same as upgrading the existing nursing schools to HND-awarding monotechnics; that will be retrogressive).

This NQF quantification should be done properly and gazetted, and not through a public statement or a mere paper circular which may have no weight or value beyond the medium of its circulation. This is the way it is being done globally; therefore the Nigerian Nursing council, Ministry of Education and other relevant authorities should look into it. There is now a paradigm shift. Let us consider the way it is being done in foreign countries especially African countries among which Nigeria is one. Countries like Ghana, Gambia, Tanzania, Kenya, Zambia and South Africa now offer top-up degrees for their diploma nurses to earn a BSc. with duration lasting between 24 – 36 months. The nursing profession leaders like UK, USA, Australia and others who set the standards have all been in our shoes before but have now phased out the hospital-based diploma nursing program. They have all given academic qualifications to their nursing certificates. They offer top-up degree (fast-track and flexible) courses for their diploma nurses within 12 – 24 calendar months. Why then is it different in Nigeria? For if it can work out in these other African Countries, then it can also work out in Nigeria where presently, diploma nurses (double qualified and with experience) still have to spend another 4 years (full-time) or 5 years (part time) in order to upgrade to a Bsc. I keep asking myself, “do we know more than these other countries that offer the upgrade for lesser durations?” or “are we merely doing ‘over-syllabus’?” Is it making us to produce better nurses than the USA, UK, South Africa, Ghana etc. that offer the upgrade for lesser duration? Are we superior to them? Unable to answer these questions, I ask myself again, “what then is the rational for spending another 4 - 5 years to earn a BSc after earning a diploma?”
MYSELF AS AN EXAMPLE
I got admission for my top-up Bsc. degree from South Africa where my Nigerian qualifications were recognized and objectively evaluated. Waivers were given for the courses I had previously done e.g. General Nursing 1 and 2, Anatomy and Physiology, Nutrition and so on (so I had no need to start all over again). Luckily for me I was able earn my degree within one and half years.
After my Bsc. degree I proceeded to a Master’s degree. I got an unconditional admission for my Msc. Occupational Health in one of the top universities in UK because of my diploma qualification in Occupational Health Nursing which I got from UCH, Ibadan. Whereas, my friend, a medical doctor from Nigeria got a conditional admission because the University said he did not have any prior knowledge in Occupational health. This only tells us that our Nigerian nursing diploma certificates are still worth something even in foreign Universities with higher standards than ours because they qualified it. Meanwhile the Nigerian Universities do not recognize same as much; hence the need to spend 4years upgrading; just like a total university fresher.

3. PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY AND BIOLOGY REQUIRED? NO!
Unlike the Nigerian Universities, the foreign university where I did my Bsc upgrade did not make any recourse to my O’ level physics, chemistry and Biology as compulsory requirements. They only checked and confirmed that I had the O’ level (for formalities) but the major requirements for the top-up degree were diploma nursing certificates (double qualifications) and at least 2 years working experience.

Due to the Nigerian Universities’ insistence on these O’ level courses as requirements for a BSc. upgrade, and the difficulties faced by many Nigerian nurses in sitting for and passing the exams, many of them after several attempts become frustrated and pushed into engaging mercenaries to sit for the exams in their place. Some buy the required results while others engage in other criminal means of passing the exam. A few that has the resources opt for their degrees outside the country while many others have simply resigned to fate; become frustrated, helpless, and hopeless and have dumped the profession (a reason why many nurses are not happy with their jobs). They usually don’t have job satisfaction, and can’t pursue desired career advancement or self-actualization because the path to getting a degree is made hard and rough for them. Most of these nurses studied nursing when physics, chemistry and biology were not compulsorily required for admission, so they cannot be blamed for their inefficiencies; they should rather be helped out.

4. That the option of the National Open University (NOUN) should be reviewed. Open Universities are mainly for people who need flexible programs or people who study while working. I reckon that many nurses need this because of the stressful nature of the profession, and the multiple roles (mother, worker, wife, and home-maker) which the practitioners play; majority being women.

The nursing program in the NOUN should be exclusively for the RN-BSc. nurses and I am of the opinion that no clinically/practical-oriented studies should be done there. This is because the nurses are expected to be already clinically experienced (only requiring some form of upgrade in theoretical knowledge, research and critical thinking skills). Those nurses who still require additional clinical tutelage can then seek admission into the regular universities that run the top-up programs for nurses but still at short-durations as being suggested. NOUN is national and represented in all regions of the country. The NOUN option makes it a lot convenient for nurses in the country to receive lectures in the various campuses instead of everyone struggling to get into the likes of O.AU, U.I, Nsukka etc. as popularly done. With this, many nurses can upgrade their diplomas to Bsc. degrees without stress while working and coping with other responsibilities.

Story Of A friend

I have a friend, a double qualified RN/RPN with years of experience who put in for the 5-year (part time) Bsc Nursing in OAU, Ife. He got to the 3rd year when he was told that his 2nd year exam script was missing, and that it meant that he didn’t sit for the exam. He was told that he would have to go back to the 2nd year as he could not have moved to the 3rd year without passing that particular course. My friend already had 2 serious car accidents by this time with the second one severe and making his car a total write-off. He was always travelling to Ife from Ijebu every weekend for 3 years. He became dejected and just abandoned the Bsc nursing programs. He is now in his final year at the Olabisi Onabanjo University studying Microbiology.
Some other nurses are also towing this path (leaving the profession) due to similar stress and frustrations. If the RN/BSc degree is like 2 years (full time) or 3 years (part time) my friend would have had his Bsc. Nursing degree a long time ago, and he would not have had those accidents in vain. If the Open University had been in operation and offering nursing degree during that time my friend would have found things easy.

5. IN-HOUSE SUPPORT:
As earlier mentioned the older generation nurses who are now various top nursing leadership positions such as matrons, supervisor, director, associational leaders etc. should encourage young and aspiring nurses who want to go for higher education. They should not fix them in difficult shift duties that will hinder or frustrate them from pursuing their degrees. Other colleagues too should not get jealous, backbite or set-up themselves for failure. They should co-operate with others till the opportunity goes round. Let us join hands to develop the nursing profession and desist from the pull-him/her-down syndrome which will make the profession stagnant. Nurse must also desist from this ‘they-must-also-pass-through-it’ syndrome which seeks to make every other person coming behind to experience what people ahead went through. This was the response I got when I made a case for a fast-tracked Bsc. upgrade for diploma nurses at a forum in which top nursing leaders were present in UCH, Ibadan during the Nightingale’s anniversary in 2007. They (i.e. those on the high table) said we younger nurses were getting lazy, and that we were always looking for short-cuts.

They also said that they spent another 5 years to upgrade to a BSc after their nursing diploma, and that there was no other way to it; therefore the upcoming nurse will also have to tow the same path. The fact that some nurses have had to spend another 4 or 5 years after their nursing diploma does not mean that every other nurse must all also go through it. Let us allow for a change and innovations, and not be rigid. It’s a global trend.
6. I also suggested that the issue of discrimination against our professional colleagues who bagged degrees in other aspects of nursing like nursing studies, nursing education, midwifery, community health nursing, mental health nursing etc. be looked into. All these are various branches of nursing science as a whole and so it sounds ridiculous to me when I hear people say that one’s degree has to bear ‘Bsc. Nursing Science’ and that other degrees as mentioned above are not accepted or recognized. Are we saying these aspects are not considered as nursing? We need people with other aspects of knowledge of nursing and not only in core nursing in order to develop the profession. Please let us follow international standards.

In conclusion, I would say that if these suggestions and others from well-meaning professional contributors are considered, implemented and not pushed aside, it will be a milestone in the development of nursing profession in this country. Nursing is and nurses are vital in the health care system. Therefore, if nurses get things wrong there will be a ripple negative effect on the overall health system.
Thanks

Adeaga Damilola Olusegun
RN/ROHN(Nigeria), BSc. Nur (South Africa), Msc. Occ. Health (UK)


Source:nursingwolrdnigeria.com


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Re: Must read for all Nigerian nurses – RN to BSN Upgrade

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Fri Oct 12, 2012 5:20 pm

BY: Adeaga Damilola Olusegun RN, ROHN, Bsc Nur (SA), Msc OH (UK)

If one has seen the light and has been liberated, it is good to also show others the light and the way to freedom. This is the reason why I have decided to put this information together. Nursing is becoming an all graduate profession, it is therefore imperative that we join the global trend and pursue Bsc degrees.
I did my nursing top-up degree in South Africa (1 and half years) from 2008 to 2009 following it up with a Masters in Occupational Health (in UK). I was lucky to have been able to do it for that short duration. Unfortunately, the university (University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban) stopped the program while I was rounding up my program for reasons which I do not know. I was only fortunate it did not affect my schedule. I think it’s now run for 3 years. It was very expensive as school fees were paid in US dollars ($9000), excluding accommodation, feeding, textbooks, flight tickets, transportation and many other sundry expenses.

However, I have done some research and discovered other African Universities (which may not be as expensive as South Africa) that also do the top-up nursing degree.

Below are some of the African universities that offer RN-BSN upgrade for shorter durations:
  • • Presbytarian University College, Ghana (2 years top-up program)
    • Central University College (Ghana) 3 yrs
    • Garden City University College, Ghana E-mail: info@gcuc.edu.gh
    • Zambia City University College of science and Technology Email: info@city.ac.zn
    • University of Eastern Africa, Baraton
    • University of Nairobi in collaboration with African Medical Research Foundation (AMREF) is starting an E-learning RN-BSc Nursing program in September, 2012. (Duration:2 and half years)
    • University of Nairobi
    • Aga Khan University, Tanzania (2 and half years)
    • Aga Khan University, Kenya
    • Aga Khan University, Uganda (2 and half years)
    • University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
These websites can be visited, and enquiries about admission eligibility, requirements, duration, dates, deadlines, processing and other relevant information can be made through the email on the contacts of the schools.

SAMPLE: LETTER OF ENQUIRY
I am a 30-year old male/female nurse from Nigeria. I have a 3-year general nursing diploma (graduated 1999) with post-basic diplomas in midwifery/psychiatry/ peri-operative nursing (graduated 2001) etc. I currently work as a general nurse/midwife/peri-operative nurse/A & E nurse with 4/5/8/10 etc. years of experience.

I would like to know if I am eligible for the RN-BSC upgrade in your institution. If yes, please kindly furnish me with the admission process, relevant fees, date, accommodation, deadlines, duration and any other information that would be relevant and important to me as a prospective foreign student.
Thanks
ADCB XYZ (RN, RNM etc.)

Please, visit these websites, perhaps you or a friend may find solution through it. Let us strive to help others and join hands to develop our profession.
May GOD bless us all.

DISCLAIMER
"Information and website links provided by Damilola Olusegun are purely informative. Damilola Olusegun does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information disclosed.
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Re: Must read for all Nigerian nurses – RN to BSN Upgrade

Unread post by Sister Ngozi » Mon Oct 15, 2012 11:40 am

You have really posted useful information that awaken minds. Great nurses let work on it.

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Re: Must read for all Nigerian nurses – RN to BSN Upgrade

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Tue Oct 30, 2012 8:42 am

Why spent another 5years to do upgrade after doing RN/RM and other diploma course?
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Re: Must read for all Nigerian nurses – RN to BSN Upgrade

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Tue Sep 24, 2013 11:04 am

Idowu Olabode Peculiar wrote:
"B.sc Nursing program in Nigeria has been phased out. It was agreed upon by stakeholders in Nursing that all Nursing program in the country should be BNSC and that's what universities in the country have been offering since 2011.

Bsc Nursing was designed for Registered Nursing certificate holders while BNSC was meant for freshers but Bsc Nursing program has now be abolished."

"Nigeria Universities Commission and Nursing and Midwifery Council of Nigeria provide the guidelines which each university follows.

Ife part time Nursing students for instance spend 5yrs academic but they actually go to school EVERY ALTERNATE WEEKENDS. If that's is the case,can't we reduce it to EVERY WEEKEND which means that by 2 and half years they should be thru with their studies?

You will agree with me that 100 and 200level courses are more of introductory which have been dealt with to some extent from a good nursing school(Except Political science and Cell pathology)

Ma,it has been agreed in Nigeria that RN certificate falls short of BSC certificate by just a narrow margin(0.5) and i can tell you that it scores higher than HND in it quantification by the federal ministry of education yet it was "RELEGATED" to HND(which still has not be implemented).

Most Nigeria RN certificate holders go to Ghana,USA,UK,Canada etc to further their studies and are offered admission for degree completion within 2 and half yrs after careful examination of their nursing school transcripts and curriculum(in some cases). Are we then saying that NIGERIA UNIVERSITIES AND EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM ARE BETTER than those in these countries?

I'm passing through the "longest route" in the course of my professional career and wouldn't want upcoming generation to experience same. A nursing lecturer from the east has confided in me that truth be told Nigeria RN certificate holders should not spend more than 3yrs to complete their degree but Nigeria Educational system does not give room for the recognition of Nursing schools as academic institutions rather training institutions(They only accept RN certificate holders to 200 on a compassionate ground as she put it)."

Just for our infomation.
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Re: Must read for all Nigerian nurses – RN to BSN Upgrade

Unread post by Naijanurse » Tue Jan 14, 2014 4:56 pm

We talk about NUC as if they invented education. The last time I checked, nursing education did not start from Nigeria! And those who started it have continuously reviewed the curriculum to accommodate the upgrade from either a licensed practical nurse to RN or RN to BSN. In some universities, RN to BSN programs r even offered. So let's face it, what is the big deal here for NUC to insist university must be 4 years for nurses who already completed 4 - 5 calendar year? The question is, is there some political undertone to this? Are there people benefiting from the issues that are big concerns to nurses? Have we got effective representation at the top to effect changes? I made enquiries with two nursing schools where I live: psychiatric and RN. All you have to do if u already have an RN qualification from your country is spend 1 academic year at a university for a bridge course to get a nursing degree. As for psych, they said I didn't have to come to class with my experience. It could be done online! Mind you, I trained in Nigeria. If the western world does not undermine my qualification, why do my own country? Are we to conclude that the authorities do not trust the system they themselves created and approved? NUC, NMCN will listen if we don't stop talking.

Oluwatoyin Daniel Adelowo
will say minimum of 2 years now in UK 1year BNSC will not grant you license to practice over there.. In US one and half or 17 months is the minimum and its called accelerated program which is mostly online where the bulk of the work is done by the student... Nursing is more than whatever we are taught in school of Nursing. I personally see that as a paraphrase of what should be leant. So I will 2 years is okay. But the major problem in Nigeria nursing sector is those in position of power that feel they suffered to acquire their certificates so therefore others must suffer to get theirs. Even from the grassroot ,from individual's institute of practise you'll some of those old nurses saying they were Nursing officers for 10-12 years before they were promoted indirectly saying nurses are been promoted to fast and they bittered about it. Also nursing council purse will grow lean if nursing schools are moved to the four walls of university just like Smls and the number of years becomes reduced........Only if Nursing council could see beyond their purse.....and join us to raise this profession from where it is to where it should be... Only if the graduates Nurses could burial their pride and be a voice to those aspiring to be.... Only if nurses to speak one voice and stop the hypocrisy....... Only we can all sacrifice our time, money and rend our loyalty to make nursing a university based profession....... Nursing will be the envy of all. Only if.............Akerele
Nursing is not just an ART, it has a heART. Nursing is not just a SCIENCE, but it has a conscience

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Re: Must read for all Nigerian nurses – RN to BSN Upgrade

Unread post by Matron Ben » Fri Feb 20, 2015 12:46 pm

Please I beg this generation of nurses to strive to become graduate nurses. People should stop patronizing the basic schools of nursing and post-basic components of hospital based training without academic grading. The future is drastically narrowing down on RNs. All post basic specialization should be postgraduate studies and if possible Nurse Practitioner degrees. This is how to redeem Nursing in Nigeria. If you want to be a nurse, please go pick your Jamb form forget about school of nursing. One day you will remember this advice. All these Post basic this and that are almost thrashing out. Non of them has been equated a recognition by the ministry of education. They are only called hospital based trainings even when the stress is heavier than PhD.

Nwakwue Nnamdi

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Re: Must read for all Nigerian nurses – RN to BSN Upgrade

Unread post by Queenet » Sat Feb 21, 2015 9:46 am

I believe RNs have some level of knowledge in healthcare. Spending a whooping 4-5 years just to get an upgrade is uncalled for and a waste of time and resources.
IT IS JUST AN UPGRADE!
Having a qualification in a related field will make one more versatile and relevant.

I don't understand why the Nigerian educational system is making it difficult for RN to upgrade to BNSC.
In other countries, eg Ghana, even Benin Republic, the maximum number of years RNs spend for this upgrade is 2.
Why is Nigeria's case different??

As far as I'm concerned, there is a selfish and political undertone to this anomaly.
I rather get a BSC in a related field, say psychology or occupational health than waste useful years in pursuit of what I know is easy to achieve elsewhere, or better still, get the upgrade in another country, since the educational system is a total failure!

I really don't bear any grudge against graduate Nurses, in fact, I envy the good ones amongst them.

The Nigerian system (NMCN & NUC) is making this "conversion" difficult and ridiculous, to the advantage of other healthcare bodies and to the disadvantage of the intended beneficiaries.

Other professions do everything possible to promote and maintain what they do, but it's the other way round in Nursing.
These are things my eyes have witnessed, not hearsay.
David C. Obasi
David-Saga Rantie Olayinka: Our system here in Nigeria is not encouraging at all, at least they ought to consider RN holders when it comes to direct entering. starting with 300l plus already spent 3years in any school of Nursing and a year service making a total of 7 years. starting with 200l is somehow not encouraging that's why a lot refuses to go further and even if they do it's in another field entirely. One thing is sure, it's determination!!! Our leaders please help us to help ourselves
Joey Akegh : I did Bsc offshore x 3yrs. Some countries offer 1 or 2 yrs. Within this 3yrs i was introduced to political sc, economics(emphasis on health economics), caculus, french, biostatistics, public health, a wholistic vivid anatomy/physiology, world cultural studies, ict/communication, psychology etc. We r a grt nation but our profession is not introduced in a way that we can be challenged with others and for this reason/s i feel others r taking advantage on us so we have to stand up to defend us. Ask us, how many professors do we have? I understand that the issue of scholarship is a challenge to many but i tell u, i save to help myself grow, no sponsor from no one. If you love nursing we can do it.
Nevertheless, our NMC shld see that RNM is maintained , scholarships improved and quacks are eliminated. I see a wave of elevation in Nursing.
Long Love Nigerian Nurse!, Long Live Nigeria!
"Changing how the world thinks about nursing".

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Re: Must read for all Nigerian nurses – RN to BSN Upgrade

Unread post by Kunle Emmanuel » Mon Feb 23, 2015 7:25 am

Great Nurse! Hardworking Nurses!! Lifesaving Nurses!!! Academic Nurses!!!! Professional Nurses!!!!!

There has been a lot of debate and rancour on issues bordering around degree in nursing, professionalism in and recognition of nursing and nurses.
I am not going to delve into these issues as such, as doing so would be tantamount to repetition of what has been posted and discussed many times on this forum and elsewhere.

This post is basically for the RN-diploma nurses.

I will want to remind us of some facts and realities.

1. There can never be equality between a degree holder and a non-degree holder irrespective of the profession. This is a fact! It's not exclusive to nursing profession alone but that's the way it is world-over. It's a standard!
Mind you, I am not talking about or comparing the practical skills of both groups (i.e. Bsc. Vs Diploma nurses). That's inconsequential! Anybody can be practically skillful. It depends on the environment, and also on how willing the person is to learn. We all learn and gain competence on the job

2. Let's stop self-pity and whining, and face the reality that stares at us in the face. For nursing profession and nurses to be accorded full recognition and proper respect alongside other professions, more nurses (atleast 90 - 95%) of nurses should have their degrees.

3. Yes, we all know how difficult it is to earn this degree in Nigeria, especially the RN-BSN transition. We know the hurdles along the track and other factors making this hellish. But I will still advise that everyone should start the process of earning this degree. It will benefit us individually and collectively (as a profession).

Firstly, it takes a personal determination focus and perseverance to do it. If one is determined and resolute, then other hindrances are surmountable.

There are different avenues to earning your degree. Everyone cannot follow the same process.

A. If you are much financially buoyant you can do the foreign accelerated course in places like UK, USA etc. Some people do theirs in some other African countries. There is no problem with this but just make sure that the school is standard, fully accredited and recognized.

B. If you are also financially buoyant but not able to opt for a foreign, you can opt for the 3-year part-time, top-up degree currently being run in Babcock University. About 6 - 8 of my school of nursing colleagues are on this course in Babcock university and will soon graduate. They are working and also studying.

C. If you can't go for the Babcock university's program due to finance, distance or other logistic reasons then you can weigh into the option of the National Open Univeristy or other part-time programs in other universities within the country. This is cheaper and more flexible. This may take longer duration but it's cheaper and more convenient. With determination and perseverance you will pull through it. It's a very convenient and flexible way to study while working. I have a friend who was junior colleague in the school of nursing; she works in an FMC and she is in her final year of study at the Open Univeristy. She will become a graduate nurse. A graduate is a graduate irrespective of the university attended

D. This last option is for people who want to take the bull by the horns. By this I mean those who may opt for the direct entry program at the university. This means starting from 2 year to run through the 5th year. This could be by part-time or full-time basis. This could be stressful and longer in duration (another 4 years) but like I earlier mentioned; with your determination, focus and perseverance you can achieve it. I also have friends who have successfully done this after their RNM diplomas.

Not all of us will travel out to do a 1 or 2-year top-up foreign degree; not all of us can go to Babcock university but all of us can achieve this goal irrespective of where (nigeria or foreign; private or govt university), how (full-time or part-time), how long (1 year, 3 years, 4 years), how much (in dollars, pounds, millions of naira or thousands of naira). Just be determined to get your degree and tow whatever pathway that is convenient for you.
Nothing is stopping you! The tunnel may be long and dark but it has an end, and there is surely light at the end.

So get up, pick up the challenge, set yourself a goal and go for it.

Let's first do our part; then we demand for recognition and full accordance of our professional and individual rights.

We shall all get to the promise land.

God bless us all!

Cheers

From one of you!
Adeaga Damilola Olusegun (RN, Bsc Nurs, Msc Occ. Health)
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